Kairy Koshoeva: A brilliant pianist

Nihan Yesil

Issue date: 12/4/06 Section: Culture
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Kairy Koshoeva has won several awards in her career as a pianist.
Media Credit: Kairy Koshoeva
Kairy Koshoeva has won several awards in her career as a pianist.

I first heard Kairy Koshoeva performing at a presentation for prospective students the UMKC Conservatory put on: A very unlikely place you would go to hear a performance. It was eight in the morning. She came backstage looking like everybody would at that hour, especially if you were requested to perform for bunch of people first thing in the morning.

Then she started playing Mozart's Piano Sonata in D major. I was flabbergasted. The lightness of her fingers and the brightness of the sound immediately put me in a dreamlike state. She seemed to be playing her encore after a successful recital.

Koshoeva was born in Kyrgyzstan in 1974, the youngest of five kids. She started the piano at age seven at the Mukash Abdraev National School of Music for Gifted Children, following her sister. Unlike her sisters, she continued to play piano and earned her B.A. and Master of Music degrees from the prestigious Gnessin Academy of Music in Moscow, where she studied with Vera Nossina.

In 2000, Koshoeva received a full scholarship to pursue the Artist Diploma at the Oberlin Conservatory, and that is when she came to the United States. While still studying at Oberlin, she met Robert Weirich, professor of piano at the UMKC Conservatory, at the Chatauqua Summer School in New York.

"I played for him in the master class, but I did not know him before and did not have plans to attend the UMKC back then," said Koshoeva.

In a piano competition in Louisiana, where Weirich was a jury member, Koshoeva met him again. After the competition he encouraged Koshoeva to apply to UMKC for her doctorate degree, and she is now studying under his direction.

Koshoeva has earned many top prizes, including the D'Angelo Young Artist Competition in Erie, Pa., the N. Rubinstein Competition in Paris, and the International Piano Competition in Vicenza, Italy.

She received the prestigious Kyrgyz Republic Presidential Youth Award in 2001, and was awarded the title of Honored Artist of Kyrgyzstan in 2003. The Rachmaninoff Gold Medal by the International Academy of Fine Arts followed in 2004.

Koshoeva has performed in recitals and as a soloist with orchestras worldwide. In May 2006, she performed with Kansas City Symphony as a soloist under the baton of Timothy Hankewich.
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The University News

Kairy Koshoeva: A brilliant pianist

Nihan Yesil

Issue date: 12/4/06 Section: Culture
  • Print
  • Email
Kairy Koshoeva has won several awards in her career as a pianist.
Media Credit: Kairy Koshoeva
Kairy Koshoeva has won several awards in her career as a pianist.

I first heard Kairy Koshoeva performing at a presentation for prospective students the UMKC Conservatory put on: A very unlikely place you would go to hear a performance. It was eight in the morning. She came backstage looking like everybody would at that hour, especially if you were requested to perform for bunch of people first thing in the morning.

Then she started playing Mozart's Piano Sonata in D major. I was flabbergasted. The lightness of her fingers and the brightness of the sound immediately put me in a dreamlike state. She seemed to be playing her encore after a successful recital.

Koshoeva was born in Kyrgyzstan in 1974, the youngest of five kids. She started the piano at age seven at the Mukash Abdraev National School of Music for Gifted Children, following her sister. Unlike her sisters, she continued to play piano and earned her B.A. and Master of Music degrees from the prestigious Gnessin Academy of Music in Moscow, where she studied with Vera Nossina.

In 2000, Koshoeva received a full scholarship to pursue the Artist Diploma at the Oberlin Conservatory, and that is when she came to the United States. While still studying at Oberlin, she met Robert Weirich, professor of piano at the UMKC Conservatory, at the Chatauqua Summer School in New York.

"I played for him in the master class, but I did not know him before and did not have plans to attend the UMKC back then," said Koshoeva.

In a piano competition in Louisiana, where Weirich was a jury member, Koshoeva met him again. After the competition he encouraged Koshoeva to apply to UMKC for her doctorate degree, and she is now studying under his direction.

Koshoeva has earned many top prizes, including the D'Angelo Young Artist Competition in Erie, Pa., the N. Rubinstein Competition in Paris, and the International Piano Competition in Vicenza, Italy.

She received the prestigious Kyrgyz Republic Presidential Youth Award in 2001, and was awarded the title of Honored Artist of Kyrgyzstan in 2003. The Rachmaninoff Gold Medal by the International Academy of Fine Arts followed in 2004.

Koshoeva has performed in recitals and as a soloist with orchestras worldwide. In May 2006, she performed with Kansas City Symphony as a soloist under the baton of Timothy Hankewich.
Page 1 of 2 next >

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Be the first to comment on this story

  • NOTE: Email address will not be published

Type your comment below (html not allowed)

  I understand posting spam or other comments that are unrelated to this article will cause my comment to be flagged for deletion and possibly cause my IP address to be permanently banned from this server.

Most Popular Articles

Poll

Hypothetically; if Christmas shopping became a thing of the past would our economy falter away from its powerhouse status?
Submit Vote

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